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As part of Mois Multi 12, Antitube presents

 Filmic Heartbeats

( Broken lines/Color/Rhythm )

 A bouquet of groundbreaking work that changed the face of film by focusing on the medium’s formal qualities. Our program looks back fondly on the intrepid filmmakers who found ways to shift the focus to the basic building blocks of their chosen art form: line, color, and sound. We display the great contrast between the work of early experimenters and the subsequent generations who followed in their footsteps.

Programming kicks off with Len Lye, who invented the technique of scratching film stock to produce abstract films. Harry Smith’s signature color and feeling-rich work is up next, followed by the irreverence of Michael Snow’s New York years, where silhouettes and shadows share center stage with a score featuring Sunny Murray on drums and Albert Ayler on saxophone. Then there is Étienne O’Leary’s hallucinatory expressionism, filled with long streaky shots and soundtracks heavily influenced by African-American improvised music—a revolution in filmmaking that shows the modern world as if lit by a giant sparkler. This magical mystery tour culminates with more recent work from Montrealer Steven Woloshen, steeped in jazz as well as the filmography of Len Lye and Norman McLaren.

Presented in conjunction with Musée de la civilisation%u2028 as part of the RIFF exhibition.

Event program

February 9, 7:30 PM

Filmic Heartbeats ( Broken lines/Color/Rhythm )

Part 1

Len Lye

Color Cry, 1952, 3 min., 16 mm.

Particles in Space, 1979, 3 min., 16 mm.

Tal Farlow, 1980, 5 min., 16 mm.

Rhythm, 1957, 1 min., 16 mm.

Free Radicals, 1958, 4 min., 16 mm.

Harry Smith

Early Abstractions, 1946–1952, 23 min., 16 mm.

Michael Snow

New York Eye and Ear Control, 1964, 34 min., 16 mm.

 

Ten-minute break followed by a free showing of

Guy Glover

Lining the Blues, 1939, 3 min., 16 mm.

 

Part 2

Étienne O’Leary

Day Tripper, 1966, 10 min., Betacam.

Homéo, 1967, 38 min., Betacam.

Chromo Sud, 1968, 21 min., Betacam.

Len Lye

Kaleidoscope, 1938, 4 min., 16 mm.

Colour Flight, 1938, 4 min., 16 mm.

Steven Woloshen

Bru Ha Ha!, 2002, 3 min., 35 mm.

Ditty Dot Comma, 2001, 3 min., 35 mm.

Len Lye

Len Lye

Free Radicals, 1958, 4 min., 16 mm.

Len Lye was the first filmmaker to work directly on the film stock, and among the first to make animated color films. This selection, including the legendary Free Radicals, covers several decades of Lye’s work, from the 1930s up to his very last films of the late 1970s. Often exotic soundtracks feature native and African-American music. A unique opportunity to see the work of a true animation pioneer whose style prefigures Norman McLaren’s

The Annecy animated film festival ranked Lye in the top ten most influential animated filmmakers.

Harry Smith

Harry Smith

Early Abstractions (1946-1952), 23 min., 16 mm.

Harry Smith has been called a leading figure in U.S. experimental filmmaking (Janas Mekas, filmmaker and director of New York’s Anthology Film Archives). His first abstract films are breathtaking—true bursts of color in the abstract expressionist mode (Smith started out as a sort of Mark Rothko of the film world). These early works immerse the viewer in Smith’s multifaceted project that comprehends anthropology, musicology, and the occult. Smith was honored with a Chairman’s Merit Grammy Award in 1991.

Guy Glover

Guy Glover

New York Eye and Ear Control, 1964, 34 min., 16 mm.

Before rising to acclaim as an NFB producer, Glover made Lining the Blues in New York City, just as the first purely formal and abstract experimental films were being made. Starring the blues itself.

Micheal Snow

Micheal Snow

New York Eye and Ear Control, 1964, 34 min., 16 mm., 1967, 38 min.

Perennial Mois Multi favorite Michael Snow needs no introduction: he is one of the most influential Canadian artists of recent years, period. Whether working in film, music, painting, sculpture, or holography, Snow takes a kaleidoscopic view of his times and its typical forms. New York Eye and Ear Control paints Snow’s singular musical and sonic colors on the wall. This collaboration with the leading lights of the “New Thing” that came to be known as free jazz is classic Snow: quite simply one of the best original scores in film. Michael Snow won the Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts and the Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award (1983, 2002).

Étienne O'Leary

Étienne O'Leary

Homéo, 1967, 38 min.

It’s been a long time coming, and this screening of Étienne O’Leary films is a major event: the long-awaited opportunity to discover films that were lost for years before being rediscovered in the vaults of the Cinémathèque québécoise. Championed by French experimental film experts and the Pompidou Center, O’Leary is among the greats of the Quebec film world, the author of stunning works whose razor-sharp sensibility embodies the great hopes, and equally great excesses, of the 1960s. Largely filmed in France, O’Leary’s work bridges the gap between Andy Warhol’s Factory and the wild experimentation of the Zanzibar group and associated filmmakers like Philippe Garrel, Pierre Clémenti, Jackie Raynal, Jean-Pierre Bouyxou, and Daniel Pommereulle. A recent limited-edition vinyl record of O’Leary’s soundtracks will be available for sale at the screening

Steven Woloshen

Steven Woloshen

Bru Ha Ha!, 2002, 3 min., 35 mm.

These days Montreal’s Steve Woloshen is far from your typical animator: he is one of few contemporaries working in the tradition of Len Lye and Norman McLaren, where brash, driving jazz and exotic music plays a starring role in films made without cameras.

Coming soon

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640, côte d'Abraham, Québec (Québec)
Canada G1R 1A1

Phone : (418) 524-2113
Fax : (418) 524-2176
antitube@antitube.ca

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